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to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
people really do talk about -- they use that kind of exercise language that i use in the book, you know, you need mental calisthenics as well as physical ones to kind of keep your mind healthy, and that apparently can be helpful in dealing with alzheimer's and things like that, so there may well be a prescription of video games we may want to dole out to senior citizens. ok. good. all right. >> called everything bad is good for you, agree, disagree, the book is there for you to read and debate. and we ..ncoming out. [applause] >> are you going to stay around? >> stick around, we are going to sign. >> is that where i >> next on the tv, trevor aaronson says since 9/11 the fbi has built up a network of over 15,000 informant and muslim communities around the u.s. he argues these informants spearhead phony terror plots which are then exposed by the fbi with great fanfare to make it look like the was doing a good job of keeping us safe. mr. aaronson is joined by coadjutor mother jones magazine. this is in our 15. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out. trevor and i spend a lot of time
to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv at c-span.org or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. on c-span2, we bring you booktv. 48 hours of non-fiction authors and books. here are programs to look out for this weekend. at 5:00 p.m. eastern. ben argues that liberals bully their competition discouraging political debate. then at 2:00 a.m. michelle alexander crime policy from the '70s were enacted to push back gangs made during the civil rights movement. on sunday with recent policy debates on congress in immigration rebring you stories from immigrants who share their experiences on booktv. that's at 4:00 p.m. eastern. at 11:00 p.m. on sunday. melvin argues that the government is spending excessively on defense. making us less secure. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. next on booktv, petered bergen and a panel of contributors discuss the book "talibanistan: negotiating the borders between terror, politics and religion" which expores the threat posed by extremist who operate in the border area between af
from writing "black hawk down "with the way thing were in the early '90s. can you give us an idea of the overall strategy and we'll get to specifics, maybe but also the tactics you have developed? >> not me. a group of people did. thanks. take a you back a little bit. at end of the vietnam war as america has done at the end of other wars want special operations unit that are created specially get gutted or they get disbanded entirely. there's a bias to do away with them inspect in the late 1980s when i joined the special forces they were in pathetic shape. they were barely a shad low what they had been at the hay day of the vietnam war. in 1980, the mission was launched to try to conduct a rescue mission in teheran to rescue the american citizens held hostage in the embassy. it failed not only painfully, but it failed for many reasons but one of which is the special operations capability we had people who were brave and strong and whatnot. they were not an integrated community capable of doing complex things indeed. it was a complex endeavor. it failed. from the ashes there was a
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
chrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his 34-year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much. thanks for coming out. i think this is a wonderful opportunity. the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. [laughter] for anyone who is, pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs, you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily, in our intelligence community, in many ways to meet the challenge of this new enemy. and more than anyone that i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping that evolution and developing the what i call the targeting engine which is what we have, i think, adopted as our primary method of defending the country. so thank you for being here, general mcchrystal. the great to see you. >> thanks, mark. thanks for a too-kind introduction. i always thought of you as a nonfiction writer, but you're free to g
of soviet affairs argues that our current level of spending on defense is excessive and is making us less secure. this 45 minute program is next on booktv. >> thank you for that introduction, and thank you for the invitation to come out here to discuss the book. let me say a few things about why wrote the book in the first place. several years ago, the secretary of defense made it known before he announced that he was going to lead the administration that he was going back to the state of washington. he was someone i follow closely. he was nominated to be the cia director in 1991, and as an obama supporter, i was shocked to find out that he was going to be kept on as the secretary of defense. what he told people, i found, and it was a major reasoning for why i wanted to write this book, what he said is that we are moving towards a smaller military. one that will do fewer things than be able to go fewer places, which he thought was a terrible thing and he added that he didn't want to be a part of that kind of a system that is going to retrench. my feeling has always been that we need a sm
of spending on defense is excessive and is making us less secure. this 45 minute program is next on book tv. >> thank you for that introduction and for the invitation to come out here to discuss the book. let me say a few things on why i wrote the book in the first place. several years ago, bob gates the secretary of defense noted before he announced he was going to leave the administration that he was going to go back to the state of washington. this is someone i followed closely over the years. i testified against him in 1991 when he was nominated to be the cia director. and as an obama supporter of course i was shocked to find out who was crowned be kept on as obama secretary of defense but when he told people i found interesting and was the major reason i wanted to write this book and what he said was we are moving towards a smaller military that will do fewer things and be able to go fewer places which he felt was a terrible thing and he added i don't want to be a part of that kind of system that is going to retrench. my feeling has been we need a smaller military that will do fewer th
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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